Friday, June 21, 2019

"Princess of the Prairie" Western Actress Peggy Stewart 1923-2019 Memorial Video



Peggy Stewart (born Peggy O'Rourke; June 5, 1923 – May 29, 2019) was an American actress known for her roles in Western B movies and television series.[1]



Early life

Stewart was born in West Palm Beach, Florida, where she was raised, the daughter of John Francis O'Rourke and Frances Velma (McCampbell) Splane, who were from Bessemer, Alabama.[2][3][4] She distinguished herself as a swimming champion in high school;[3] in the 1930s, her family moved to California, where she met character actor Henry O'Neill. He recommended her to Paramount Pictures executives who were looking for a new actress for the part of Joel McCrea's teenage daughter in Wells Fargo (1937).[3] Her work in the film led to numerous other film roles.[3]



Career

In April 1944, Stewart signed a contract with Republic Pictures and began starring in Western B movies opposite such actors as Allan Lane, Sunset Carson, and Wild Bill Elliott.[1] During that time she played in several episodes of Adventures of Red Ryder. She usually played the part of the tough heroine, rather than a passive girl needing to be saved.[1] From 1944 to 1951 she starred in 35 films, most of which were Westerns and film serials. She also starred with Gene Autry several times during that period. as well as appearing on several episodes of The Cisco Kid, including "Oil Land," which first aired on October 10, 1950.



In 1949, she played alongside Jim Bannon in Ride, Ryder, Ride. She again played the part of heroine to Bannon in 1949, starring in The Fighting Redhead. In 1952 she starred with Bill Elliott in Kansas Territory. In 1957, she had a minor role on CBS's Have Gun – Will Travel episode "The Outlaw." In 1958, she was cast as Etta Jackson, the romantic interest of the painter Hurley Abbott, played by Brad Johnson, in the episode "The Underdog" of the ABC/Desilu western series, The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp, with Hugh O'Brian in the title role.





Peggy Stewart appeared in The Twilight Zone episode "The Shelter."



Later years

Her career slowed in the 1960s, and by the 1970s she was residing in Studio City, California. Stewart won the Golden Boot Awards in 1984. Semi-retired, Stewart still continued to act on occasion. She played a minor part in a 1990 episode of Seinfeld titled "The Implant," in which she portrayed the aunt of George Costanza's girlfriend.

Stewart played Pam Beesly's grandmother, Mee-Maw, in a 2009 episode of The Office and reprised the role in a 2010 episode. In 2012, she played Grandma Delores in Adam Sandler's comedy film, That's My Boy.



Personal life

In her latter decades, Stewart appeared regularly as a guest speaker at Western film festivals.[3] From 1993 till her death, Stewart appeared as a special guest at the annual Lone Pine Film Festival.[5]

Stewart was married twice. In 1940 she married actor Don "Red" Barry; the marriage ended in divorce in 1944.[3] She was married to actor Buck Young from 1953 until his death on February 9, 2000.[6]

Her sister, Patricia Ann O'Rourke, was married to the actor Wayne Morris.[7]

Peggy Stewart died in May 2019 at the age of 95.[8][9][10][11]




Partial filmography

Wells Fargo (1937) as Alice MacKay
White Banners (1938) as Sally's friend (uncredited)
Little Tough Guy (1938) Rita Belle
That Certain Age (1938) as Mary Lee
Little Tough Guys in Society (1938) as Jane
Man About Town (1939) as Mary, chorus girl (uncredited)
5th Ave Girl (1939) as Katherine's girlfriend (uncredited)
Everybody's Hobby (1939) as Bunny
Star Dust (1940) as College girl (uncredited)
All This, and Heaven Too (1940) as Helen Lexington
Back Street (1941) as Freda Smith
Sleepytime Gal (1942) as Dancer
Girls in Chains (1943) as Terry, convict (uncredited)
Tucson Raiders (1944) as Beth Rogers
Silver City Kid (1944) as Ruth Clayton
Stagecoach to Monterey (1944) as Jessie Wade
Cheyenne Wildcat (1944) as Betty Lou Hopkins
Code of the Prairie (1944) as Helen Matson
Firebrands of Arizona (1944) as Poppy Calhoun
Sheriff of Las Vegas (1944) as Ann Carter
Utah (1945) as Jackie
The Vampire's Ghost (1945) as Julia Vance
Oregon Trail (1945) as Jill Layton
Bandits of the Badlands (1945) as Hallie Wayne
Marshal of Laredo (1945) as Judy Bowers
Rough Riders of Cheyenne (1945) as Melinda Sterling
The Tiger Woman (1945) as Phyllis Carrington
The Phantom Rider (1946) as Doris Shannon
Days of Buffalo Bill (1946) as Molly Owens
California Gild Rush (1946) as Hazel Parker
Sheriff of Redwood Valley (1946) as Molly
Alias Billy the Kid (1946) as Ann Marshall
Red River Renegades (1946) as Julia Bennett
Conquest of Cheyenne (1946) as Cheyenne Jackson
The Invisible Informer (1946) as Rosalind Baylor
Stagecoach to Denver (1946) as 'Beautiful', fake May Barnes
Son of Zorro (1947) as Kate Wells
Trail to San Antone (1947) as Kit Barlow
Vigilantes of Boomtown (1947) as Molly McVey
Rustlers of Devil's Canyon (1947) as Bess
Messenger of Peace (1947) as Evangeline Lockley
Tex Granger (1948) as Helen Kent
Dead Man's Gold (1948) as June Thornton
Frontier Revenge (1948) as Joan De Lysa
Ride, Ryder, Ride! (1948) as Libby Brooks
Desert Vigilance (1949) as Betty Long
The Fighting Redhead (1949) as Sheila O'Connor
Cody of the Pony Express (1950) as Linda Graham
The Cisco Kid (1950–1953) (TV, 5 episodes) as various characters
The Gene Autry Show (1950) (TV) as Ellie March
Pride of Maryland (1951) as Christine Loomis
The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok (1951) (TV) as Jane
The Black Lash (1952) as Joan De Lysa
The Roy Rogers Show (1952) (TV, 2 episodes) as Eileen Barton/Myra Fuller
Kansas Territory (1952) as Kay Collins
Montana Incident (1952) as Clara Martin
Gang Busters (1952) (TV) as Violet Fairchild
The Living Bible (1952)
The Range Rider (1953) (TV) as Mrs. Brant
The Millionaire (1956) (TV) as Mary
The Silent Service (1957–1958) (TV) as First nurse/Sister Mary
Have Gun – Will Travel (1957–1964) (TV, 2 episodes) as Edna Raleigh/Sarah Holt
The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp (1958–1959) (TV, 2 episodes) as Elsa Johnson/Etta Jackson
Peter Gunn (1959) (TV) as Wilma Baxter
Yancy Derringer (1959) (TV) as Karen Ogilvie
Not for Hire (TV series) (1959) as Nadine
National Velvet (1960) as Mrs. Anderson
Hotel de Paree (1960) (TV) as Martha Holcombe
Pony Express (1960) (TV)
Gunsmoke (1961, Episode: "The Long, Long Trail") (TV) as Fan Hacker
The Rebel (1961) (TV) as Sarah Wallace
The Smith Family (1961) (TV) as Mrs. Dennison
The Americans (1961) (TV) as Mrs. Gilroy
Lassie (1961) (TV) as Mrs. Johnson
When the Clock Strikes (1961) as Mrs. Pierce
The Twilight Zone (1961) (TV) as Grace Stockton
Gun Street (1961) as Mrs. Knudson
The Clown and the Kid (1961) as Sister Grace
The Fugitive (1964) (TV) as Mrs. Franklin
Daniel Boone (1965) (TV) as Ida Morgan
The Way West (1967) as Mrs. Turley
Hondo (1967) (TV) as Mrs. Malcolm
The Mod Squad (1969) (TV) as Mrs. Kane
Ironside (1970) (TV) as Mrs. Knudson
The Animals (1970) as Mrs. Emily Perkins
Sarge (1972) (TV) as Mrs. Whitman
Pickup on 101 (1972)
The Bold Ones: The New Doctors (1972) (TV) as Mrs. Norman
The Stranger (1973) as Inner council member (uncredited)
Terror in the Wax Museum (1973) as Second chairwoman
Emergency! (1974) (TV, 2 episodes) as Martha Felt/Claire Freeman
Baretta (1975) (TV) as Teacher
White House Madness (1975) as Rosemary Woods
Bobbie Jo and the Outlaw (1976) as Hattie Baker
Black Oak Conspiracy (1977) as Virginia Metcalf
The Fall of the House of Usher (1979) as Barmaid
Taxi (1980) (TV) as Buyer
Beyond Evil (1980) as Lady patient
Quincy, M.E. (1980) (TV) as Mrs. Ethel Sullivan
The Adventures of Nellie Bly (1981) (TV) as Mrs. Long
Seinfeld (1993) as Aunt May
Beverly Hills, 90210 (1999) (TV) as Mrs. Fike
Norm Show (2001) (TV) as Tippi
Popular (2001) (TV) as Old lady
Yes, Dear (2001) (TV) as Old lady
Big Chuck, Little Chuck (2004) as Liz
My Name Is Earl (2007) (TV) as Dotty Lake
The Riches (2007–2008) (TV) as Cherien's mother
NCIS (2008) (TV) as Elderly lady
Weeds (2009) (TV)
FlashForward (2009) (TV) as Secretary
Operating Instructions (2009) as Older lady
The Office (2009) (TV) as Pam's Nana Sylvia
The Runaways (2010) Grandma Oni
Justified (2010) (TV) as Mrs. Inez Davis
Community (2010) (TV) as Agnes
Dadgum, Texas (2011) (TV) as Pearl Ruth Anna 'MiMa' Magee
That's My Boy (2012) as Grandma Delores
Getting On (2014) (TV) as Mrs. Decker



References

1. "Peggy Stewart". B-Westerns. Retrieved August 11, 2014.
2. https://prabook.com/web/peggy_o_rourke.stewart/238372?profileId=238372
3. Erickson, Hal. "Peggy Stewart". The New York Times. Retrieved August 11, 2014.
4. [1]
5. "Lone Pine Film Festival Celebrates 25 Years". Lone Pine Film Festival. August 4, 2014. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved August 11, 2014.
6. "Peggy Stewart: Companions". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved August 11, 2014.
7. Albuquerque Journal, Page 5, February 20, 1942
8. "Peggy Stewart". Legacy.com. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
9. Alvarenga, Emily (June 5, 2019). "Western actress Peggy Stewart dies at 95". The Santa Clarita Valley Signal. California, Santa Clarita. Archived from the original on 6 June 2019. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
10. "Peggy Stewart". www.aveleyman.com. Retrieved June 2, 2019.
11. https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/peggy-stewart-dead-leading-lady-westerns-at-republic-pictures-was-95-1216791

-- wikipedia 

"Dean of Laguna Artists" Painter Frank Cuprien 1948 Fairhaven Cemetery


Frank William Cuprien (August 23, 1871 – June 21, 1948) was an American plein-air painter of the California impressionism movement, noted for marine scenes and opalescent seascapes. 


As a leading member of the Laguna Beach, California art colony, Cuprien became known as the "Dean of Laguna Artists."[1]


Education

Cuprien, born in Brooklyn, New York, studied both art and music. He took his art training at the Art Students League of New York and the Cooper Union Institute.[2] He then studied landscape painting under Carl Philipp Weber in Philadelphia. During an 11-year residency in Europe, Cuprien studied art in Rome, with Karl Raupp in Munich, and at the Academie Julian in Paris.[1][3][4]


Cuprien was also formally trained in voice and classical piano, attending the royal conservatory in Munich (Hochschule für Musik und Theater München) and graduating from the royal conservatory of Leipzig (Hochschule für Musik und Theater Leipzig) in 1905.[3][4]


Career

After returning to the United States from Europe, Cuprien spent 5 years teaching art at Baylor University in Texas. In 1912, he became enamored with the coastline of Southern California and briefly lived on Catalina Island before moving permanently to Laguna Beach, California. 


Cuprien moved into a rustic studio on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean and named it "The Viking." Cuprien became an integral member of the artist community in Laguna Beach where he helped establish the Laguna Beach Art Association and its art gallery. His home was a gathering place for fellow artists, and served as a site for exhibitions and Cuprien's piano recitals. Cuprien became known as the "Dean of Laguna artists."[5][6]


Death

In 1948, Cuprien died after suffering a stroke.[2] In his will, he left his estate to the Laguna Beach Art Association and requested that he be buried in his blue painter's smock.[7] The street Cuprien Way in Laguna Beach was later named in his honor.[8]

Frank Cuprien is buried at Fairhaven Memorial Park in Santa Ana, California. 


References

1. "Laguna Honors Frank Cuprien". Los Angeles Times. Laguna Beach. August 24, 1941. p. 20.
2. Hughes, Edna Milton (1986). Artists in California 1786-1940. Hughes Publishing Co. p. 112. ISBN 0-9616112-0-0.
3. Anderson, Susan; Colburn, Bolton (1996). Impressions of California. The Irvine Museum. p. 119. ISBN 0-9635-468-7-2.
4. Stern, Jean (May 1, 1993). Early California impressionists. Nevada Museum of Art. p. 26.
5. Vogel, Claire Marie. Laguna Beach. Images of America. Arcadia Publishing. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-7385-6997-0.
6. "Death Claims Frank Cuprien". Los Angeles Times. Laguna. June 22, 1948. p. 14.
7. "Cuprien Estate Left to Laguna Art Group". Los Angeles Times. June 27, 1948. p. A2.
8. "Streets Named for Artists". Los Angeles Times (Orange County ed.). July 12, 1973. p. G7.


Wednesday, June 19, 2019

"Star Trek" Actor Anton Yelchin 2016 Hollywood Forever Cemetery - UPDATED GRAVE PHOTOS


Anton Viktorovich Yelchin (Russian: Анто́н Ви́кторович Ельчи́н; March 11, 1989 – June 19, 2016) was an American film and television actor, known for portraying Pavel Chekov in the Star Trek reboot series, Jacob Helm in Like Crazy, Jim Lake Jr. in Trollhunters, and several other prominent roles.

UPDATED GRAVE PHOTOS TOWARDS BOTTOM OF POST



Born to a Russian Jewish family in Leningrad, Yelchin relocated to the United States as an infant. He began performing in the late 1990s, appearing in several television roles and the Hollywood films Along Came a Spider and Hearts in Atlantis (both 2001). His role as Jacob Clarke in the Steven Spielberg miniseries Taken was significant in furthering his career as a child actor.[1] He later appeared on the television series Huff and appeared in the films Alpha Dog (2007), Terminator Salvation (2009), Charlie Bartlett (2007), Fright Night (2011), The Smurfs (2011), Only Lovers Left Alive (2013), Green Room (2015), and Thoroughbred (2017). He appeared in Star Trek (2009), Star Trek Into Darkness (2013), and the posthumously released Star Trek Beyond (2016).



Early in the morning of June 19, 2016, Yelchin was found by friends pinned between his Jeep Grand Cherokee and a brick pillar outside his home in Studio City, California, in what was described as a "freak accident."[2] He was pronounced dead later that day at the age of 27.[3][4]



Early life

Yelchin was born March 11, 1989, in Leningrad, Soviet Union (now Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation).[5][6] His parents, Irina Korina and Viktor Yelchin, were pair figure skaters who were celebrities and stars of the Leningrad Ice Ballet for 15 years.[7][8] His family is Jewish; in the USSR, they were subjected to religious and political oppression.[7][9][10] Yelchin had said: "My grandparents suffered in ways I can't even begin to understand under Stalin."[10] Nationally, Yelchin's parents were the third-ranked pair team; they thus qualified for the 1972 Winter Olympics, but were not permitted to participate by the Soviet authorities.[7][8] (Yelchin had said the reason was unclear: "I don't exactly know what that was – because they were Jewish or because the KGB didn't want them to travel.")[11]



Yelchin's family moved to the United States in September 1989, when Anton was six months old, after receiving refugee status from the United States Department of State.[7][8] Yelchin's mother worked as a figure skating choreographer and his father as a figure skating coach, having been Sasha Cohen's first trainer.[12][13] Yelchin's uncle is the children's author and painter Eugene Yelchin.[7]



In an article published in the Los Angeles Times in December 1989, Yelchin's mother stated "A woman came up, saw Anton, and said, 'He's beautiful. He will be actor.'"[7] Yelchin had stated that he "wasn't very good" at figure skating, his parents' profession.[14]



Career

Yelchin began acting at the age of 9 in the independent film A Man is Mostly Water. His earliest roles include Jackson in A Time for Dancing,[1] Milo in Delivering Milo, Tommy Warshaw in House of D, and Jacob Clarke in the miniseries Taken. 



He made a guest appearance as Stewart, Cheryl David's cousin and a self-described magician (who only knows one card trick), in a season four episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm, and starred as Byrd Huffstodt, the 14-year-old son of Dr. Craig "Huff" Huffstodt (Hank Azaria), on the television series Huff, which ran from 2004 to 2006.



In 2006, he also had a role on an episode ("Tru Love") of the series Law and Order: Criminal Intent, playing a boy who falls in love with his teacher. His biggest film recognition came for the role of Bobby Garfield in Hearts in Atlantis (2001), for which he won Best Performance in a Feature Film – Leading Young Actor at the 2002 Young Artist Awards. He also appeared in the Criminal Minds episode "Sex, Birth and Death" as Nathan Harris, a boy who has fantasies about killing prostitutes.



Yelchin appeared in Alpha Dog, a crime thriller that received an American release on January 12, 2007. In the film he played Zack Mazursky, a character based on real-life kidnap and murder victim Nicholas Markowitz.[12] USA Today's review described the performance as "heartbreakingly endearing."[15] After the premiere, Markowitz's mother praised his portrayal of her son.[16] Yelchin subsequently headlined Fierce People, a drama which received a limited release on September 7 of that year and co-starred Diane Lane, Donald Sutherland and Chris Evans. 



In 2008 Yelchin played the title role in Charlie Bartlett, a film about a wealthy teenager in a public high school.[17] Also that year, Yelchin appeared alongside the Russian duo t.A.T.u. in the movie You and I (which was filmed in Moscow during the summer of 2007),[18] and co-starred with Susan Sarandon and Justin Chatwin in Middle of Nowhere. He next starred in two May 2009 releases: the eleventh Star Trek film, in which he portrayed 17-year-old navigator Pavel Chekov, and Terminator Salvation, in which he was cast as a teenage Kyle Reese.[19][20]



In 2011 Yelchin portrayed Charley Brewster in the remake of Fright Night, directed by Craig Gillespie,[21] starred in the romantic drama Like Crazy, and voiced Clumsy Smurf in the film adaptation of The Smurfs and its sequel.[22][23] He provided the voice for the Albino Pirate character in the US version of the animated film The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists! (released in North America as The Pirates! Band of Misfits) (2012),[24][25] (replacing Russell Tovey) and for Shun in From Up on Poppy Hill by Studio Ghibli.



He reprised the role of Chekov in Star Trek Into Darkness (2013) and played the lead in the thriller Odd Thomas (2013)[26] and the horror comedy Burying the Ex (2014). In 2015, he starred in the independent horror film Green Room which premiered at the Cannes film festival that year and received limited theatrical release in May 2016.


Shortly before his death on June 19, 2016, he had reprised his role as Chekov again in Star Trek Beyond, which was released on July 22, 2016. He also completed filming several independent films which are in post-production.[27]

He recorded the voice role of Jim in Guillermo del Toro's Trollhunters not long before his death.[28][29]



Personal life

Yelchin once played in a punk band named the Hammerheads, which later disbanded.[9][30] He enjoyed playing the guitar, saying that it gave him "a lot of fulfillment," and was a fan of acoustic blues music.

He attended the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies in Tarzana, California,[12] and enrolled at the University of Southern California in fall 2007 to study film.[31]



Death

Early in the morning of June 19, 2016, Yelchin was found by friends pinned between his Jeep Grand Cherokee and a brick pillar outside his home in Studio City, California, in what was described as a "freak accident."[32] Yelchin exited his car while in his driveway, which is on a steep incline, when it rolled back and trapped him against the pillar and a security fence.[2] He was pronounced dead later that day.[3] The Jeep crushed his lungs, and he is believed to have died within 60 seconds of impact.[33]

The Los Angeles County coroner's office identified the cause of death as "blunt traumatic asphyxia" and stated that there were "no obvious suspicious circumstances involved."[34] The vehicle involved was among some Fiat Chrysler models under a recall notice for transmission errors leading to unintended rolling, and while the initial recall had begun before Yelchin's death, no affected vehicles had yet been repaired. Following his death, the producers of Star Trek said the role of Chekov would not be recast and the character would be written out of any subsequent films. Star Trek Beyond was dedicated to his memory.[35]

On August 1, 2016, the attorney of Yelchin's parents announced that they were planning to file a wrongful death lawsuit against Fiat Chrysler.[36] The car manufacturers later refused to accept the blame for the accident, stating Yelchin was responsible for his own death because he had misused the vehicle.[37]



Anton Yelchin is buried at Hollywood Forever Cemetery





UPDATED GRAVE PHOTOS





Filmography

Film

Year Title Role Notes

2000 A Man Is Mostly Water Augie
2001 Delivering Milo Milo
2001 15 Minutes Boy in Burning Building
2001 Along Came a Spider Dimitri Starodubov
2001 Hearts in Atlantis Bobby Garfield
2002 Rooftop Kisses Charlie
2004 House of D Tom Warshaw




2005 Fierce People Finn Earl

2006 Alpha Dog Zack Mazursky
2007 Charlie Bartlett Charlie Bartlett
2008 New York, I Love You Boy in the Park Segment: "Brett Ratner"
2008 Middle of Nowhere Dorian Spitz
2009 Star Trek Pavel Chekov
2009 Terminator Salvation Kyle Reese
2010 Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac Ace Zuckerman



2011 Like Crazy Jacob Helm

2011 You and I Edvard Nikitin
2011 The Beaver Porter Black
2011 The Smurfs Clumsy Smurf (voice)
2011 Fright Night Charley Brewster
2011 The Smurfs: A Christmas Carol Clumsy Smurf (voice) Short film
2012 From Up on Poppy Hill Shun Kazama (voice) English dub
2012 The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists Albino Pirate (voice) American dub
2013 Movie 43 Necrophiliac worker at morgue Deleted scene
2013 Odd Thomas Odd Thomas
2013 Star Trek Into Darkness Pavel Chekov
2013 Only Lovers Left Alive Ian
2013 The Smurfs: The Legend of Smurfy Hollow Clumsy Smurf (voice) Short film
2013 The Smurfs 2 Clumsy Smurf (voice)



2014 Rudderless Quentin

2014 5 to 7 Brian Bloom
2014 The Apprentice Wayne Short film




2014 Cymbeline Cloten

2014 Burying the Ex Max
2014 Dying of the Light Milton Schultz
2015 Experimenter Rensaleer
2015 Broken Horses Jacob Heckum
2015 The Driftless Area Pierre




2015 Green Room Pat

2015 Unity[38] Narrator Documentary
2016 Rise Basil Short film
2016 Star Trek Beyond Pavel Chekov Posthumous release
2016 Porto Jake Kleeman Posthumous release
2017 Thoroughbred Tim Posthumous release
2017 Rememory Todd Posthumous release
2017 We Don't Belong Here Maxwell Green Posthumous release

Television

Year Title Role Notes




2000 ER Robbie Edelstein Episode: "Be Still My Heart"


2000 Geppetto Featured Television film
2002 Judging Amy Davis Bishop Episode: "The Justice League of America"
2002 Taken Jacob Clarke – Child 2 episodes
2002 The Practice Justin Langer 2 episodes
2003 Without a Trace Johnny Atkins Episode: "The Bus"
2004 Curb Your Enthusiasm Stewart Episode: "The Blind Date"
2004 NYPD Blue Evan Grabber Episode: "Take My Wife, Please"
2004 Jack Jack Television film
2004–2006 Huff Byrd Huffstodt 25 episodes
2006 Law and Order: Criminal Intent Keith Tyler Episode: "Tru Love"
2006 Criminal Minds Nathan Harris Episode: "Sex, Birth, Death"
2011 The Life and Times of Tim Trent (voice) Episode: "The Caddy's Shack/The Sausage Salesman"
2015–2016 SuperMansion Dudley (voice) 2 episodes
2016 Trollhunters Jim (voice) 26 episodes; posthumously released

Video games

Year Title Role

2013 Star Trek Pavel Chekov (voice)
2013 The Smurfs 2 Clumsy Smurf (voice)

Accolades

Year Award Category Title of work Medium Result

2002 Phoenix Film Critics Award Best Youth Performance Hearts in Atlantis Film Nominated
2002 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a Feature Film – Leading Young Actor Hearts in Atlantis Film Won
2003 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a TV Movie, Mini-Series or Special – Supporting Young Actor Taken Television Nominated
2005 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a TV Movie, Miniseries or Special – Leading Young Actor Jack Television Nominated
2009 Boston Society of Film Critics Awards Best Ensemble Cast Star Trek Film Won
2009 Washington DC Area Film Critics Association Awards Best Ensemble Star Trek Film Nominated
2010 Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards Best Acting Ensemble Star Trek Film Nominated



References

1. Staff (1996–2012). "Anton Yelchin". AskMen - Become A Better Man. IGN Entertainment, Inc.
2. "'Star Trek' actor Anton Yelchin dies in freak car accident". CNN.
3. "Actor who played Chekov in Star Trek reboot dead after being pinned by own car". CBC News.
4. "The mangled gate Anton Yelchin was pinned against by his two TON Jeep". Mail Online.
5. Gilbey, Ryan (June 20, 2016). "Anton Yelchin obituary". The Guardian. UK.
6. Bentley, Rick (February 22, 2008). "A beaming Yelchin is getting beamed up/Young actor, starring as teenager in Charlie Bartlett, sets his sights on the stars". Houston Chronicle.
7. Slate, Libby (December 22, 1989). "Former Soviet Skate Stars Top Bill at Knott's". Los Angeles Times. p. 1. Then too there was religious and political oppression. In 1972, as the nationally third-ranked pair team, they qualified for the Olympics but were not permitted to go because of their religion.
8. Longsdorf, Amy (May 10, 2009). "A bold step for young actor". The Mercury.
9. LaGambina, Gregg (2009). "The Wanderlust of Anton Yelchin". Flaunt. The Star of David has been in my family for a long time, and obviously I'm Jewish.
10. Pfefferman, Naomi (April 2, 2015). "Anton Yelchin explores extramarital love's time slot in '5 to 7'". The Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles.
11. Stern, Marlow (August 19, 2011). "Hollywood's New 'It' Geek". The Daily Beast.
12. "Dog star a veteran at 17". Pasadena Star News. January 6, 2007.
13. Itier, Emmanuel (January 30, 2008). "On Top of the Teenage World as 'Charlie Bartlett' and as Pavel Chekov in 'Star Trek' Reboot". Buzzine.
14. Germain, David (October 26, 2011). "Trek' co-star Yelchin finds love in 'Like Crazy'". The Boston Globe.
15. Puig, Claudia (January 11, 2007). "Alpha Dog: Razor-sharp reality". USA Today.
16. "Teenage Actor Uncomfortable With Pool Sex Scene". Contact Music. December 18, 2006.
17. "Anton Yelchin, Robert Downey Jr., Hope Davis, Kat Dennings, And Tyler Hilton Go Dark For Charlie Bartlett". MovieWeb. Archived from the original on June 19, 2006.
18. Dawtrey, Adam (June 6, 2007). "Mischa Barton to star in Joffe's t.A.T.u.". Variety.
19. Goldstein, Gregg (March 19, 2008). "Yelchin finds Salvation". The Hollywood Reporter. 
20. Siegel, Tatiana (August 8, 2007). "Yelchin sets course for Trek". The Hollywood Reporter. 
21. "Fright Night Redo Finds Its Paranoid Neighbor". Bloody Disgusting. April 6, 2010.
22. Sciretta, Peter (April 5, 2010). "Anton Yelchin and Fred Armisen Join The Smurfs".
23. Yelchin, Anton (30 January 2012). "Crazy In Love — Anton Yelchin Interview". SteveCummins.com (Interview). Interview with Steve Cummins.
24. Simpson, Rob (2012). "The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists (Review)". Vulture Hound Magazine. Vulture Hound Magazine.
25. "The Pirates! Band of Misfits: Cast and Crew". MovieWeb.com. 1995–2012.
26. Hill, Logan (2011-10-23). "Anton Yelchin on His Role in 'Like Crazy'". New York Magazine.
27. "Anton Yelchin: 4 Unreleased Movies Featuring the Late Actor". July 25, 2016. 
28. Andreeva, Nellie (15 June 2016). "'Trollhunters': Anton Yelchin, Kelsey Grammer and Ron Perlman To Lead Cast Of Guillermo del Toro Netflix Animated Series".
29. "'Trollhunter' Trailer: First Look at Guillermo del Toro's New Series". Cartoon Brew.
30. Kirk, Jeremy (March 21, 2011). "SXSW Video Interview: Anton Yelchin for Mel Gibson's 'The Beaver'".
31. "Anton Yelchin Biography". M and C. 
32. Times, Los Angeles. "'Star Trek' actor Anton Yelchin's SUV was recalled in April over rollaway risk". latimes.com.
33. "Star Trek actor Anton Yelchin died of his injuries in less than a minute after his Jeep crushed him as coroner officially rules it an accident". Daily Mail.
34. Mather, Kate (June 19, 2016). "Anton Yelchin, actor in 'Star Trek' films, dies in freak car accident at age 27". Los Angeles Times.
35. Valdes-Dapena, Peter; Melas, Chloe (22 June 2016). "Fix ready for Jeep gear shift problem that killed Anton Yelchin". CNN. Cable News Network, A Time-Warner Company.
36. "Anton Yelchin's parents will sue car company". USA Today. 1 August 2016.
37. "Star Trek actor Anton Yelchin is blamed for his own death as dealership which sold him the Jeep that killed him claims he 'misused' the vehicle". Daily Mail.
38. McNary, Dave (April 22, 2015). "Documentary 'Unity' Set for Aug. 12 Release with 100 Star Narrators". Variety.