Saturday, September 29, 2012

Buster Keaton READS Los Angeles Morgue Files



Buster Keaton READS Los Angeles Morgue Files


Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Gracie Allen READS Los Angeles Morgue Files



Gracie Allen READS Los Angeles Morgue Files

Oscar Levant READS Los Angeles Morgue Files



Oscar Levant READS Los Angeles Morgue Files

Thursday, September 13, 2012

SUNRISE (1927) Janet Gaynor Meets F. W. Murnau


SUNRISE: A Song of Two Humans, also known as SUNRISE, is a 1927 American silent film directed by German film director F. W. Murnau. The story was adapted by Carl Mayer from the short story "Die Reise nach Tilsit" ("A Trip to Tilsit") by Hermann Sudermann.




SUNRISE won an Academy Award for Unique and Artistic Production at the first ever Academy Awards ceremony in 1929. In 1937, SUNRISE's original negative was destroyed in a nitrate fire. A new negative was created from a surviving print. In 1989, this film was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. In a 2002 critics' poll for the British Film Institute, SUNRISE was named the seventh-best film in the history of motion pictures, tied with Battleship Potemkin.




In 2007, the film was chosen #82 on the 10th anniversary update of the American Film Institute's 100 Years... 100 Movies list of great films. SUNRISE is one of the first with a soundtrack of music and sound effects recorded in the then-new Fox Movietone sound-on-film system. Much of the exterior shooting was done at Lake Arrowhead, California.

Twilight Zone Branch Office of Los Angeles Morgue Files


Twilight Zone Branch Office of Los Angeles Morgue Files




Donald Pleasance READS Los Angeles Morgue Files



Donald Pleasance READS Los Angeles Morgue Files

Sunday, September 2, 2012

Critical Mass Cyclist KILLED in UCLA Crash

 
At about 9:50 p.m. Friday night, Los Angeles resident Jerico Culata was riding southbound on De Neve Drive near the road’s intersection with Charles E. Young Drive as part of a Critical Mass bike ride, when he crashed into a nearby wall, said LAPD officer Sara Faden.





He was transported to the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center where he died from injuries sustained in the crash at 10:05 p.m.



Reportedly, Culata was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident and was riding a bike without brakes.